Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Stanford Department of Emergency Medicine actively seeks and celebrates diversity and promotes inclusion in all aspects of our work. 

We constantly strive to provide a safe and supportive environment for all through training and education in respect for differences and awareness of implicit and explicit biases. 

We advance diversity and inclusion in recruitment, retention, and promotion, and enforce respect for the dignity of all members of our community including women, members of minority groups, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities.

Diversity and inclusion are codified in our department values because they make our team, our practice, and our world immeasurably stronger. 


Watch & Learn

Resident Mariame Fofana, MD shares how her upbringing informs her experiences in medicine and at Stanford. Watch video

Italo Brown, MD recounts experiences in the ED and using ethnicity as a strength. More

Vice Chair of Education Michael Gisondi, MD and partners have created a multi-modular, interactive, free online course on how to teach LGBTQ+ health. Learn more. 


From Our Faculty: Research, Resources & Training


Women in EM

Stanford School of Medicine has almost double the national average of female department chairs, including our chair Andra Blomkalns, MD, MBA. 

The majority of leadership roles within the Department of Emergency Medicine are held by women, and we have nearly twice the national percentage of practicing female physicians.

The Stanford Women in EM group holds monthly gatherings for female attendings, fellows, and residents to connect, learn and share career insight.

Topics covered include Fertility, Pregnancy, and Medicine; Imposter Syndrome; Bias in the Workplace; Strategic Career Planning; Female MD to RN Relationship and Self Advocacy; Dealing with Inappropriate Work Environment and Financial Planning and Investment.


Our Patients

Diversity and inclusion in our faculty, students, and staff reflect the diversity of our patients: 

  • Our patients are 63% Hispanic, Asian, or Black.
  • The majority of our patients receive federally-subsidized care.